african american art, african american artist, Art, Art History, Black Art Historians, Black Art History, Blog, Contemporary Art, Harlem Reinassance

Richard Powell- Art & Art History

Richard J. Powell is John Spencer Bassett Professor of Art & Art History at Duke University, where he has taught since 1989.  He studied at Morehouse College and Howard University before earning his doctorate in art history at Yale University.  Along with teaching courses in American art, the arts of the African Diaspora, and contemporary visual studies, he has written extensively on topics ranging from primitivism to postmodernism, including such titles as Homecoming: The Art and Life of William H. Johnson (1991), Black Art: A Cultural History (1997 & 2002), and Cutting a Figure: Fashioning Black Portraiture (2008).[1]

Art, Blog, study

Portrait Studies

The portrait below is my seventh of the same one, it's not complete but it does get a little better each time. My peer's critiques don't sting as much and my ability to focus while painting has increased. I'm practicing patience which is like pulling teeth, but I think this is my take away. I always want it right now but that's not how life works and with creating art and writing I'm slowly learning....patience. I don't know the ending of this journey but I am enjoying the ride and I'm enjoying sharing it with you.

african american art, african american artist, Art, Art History, Artists, Black Art History, Blog

Neptune Thurston – Portrait Painter

It was even discovered that Neptune Thurston taught artist, Gilbert Stuart how to paint heads and faces.**

african american art, african american artist, Art, Art History, Artists, Black Art History, Blog, collage, Contemporary Art, painting

Thornton Dial – Artist

"Art is strange-looking stuff and most people don’t understand art. Most people don’t understand my art, the art of the Negroes, because most people don’t understand me, don’t understand the Negroes at all. If everybody understand one another, wouldn’t nobody make art. Art is something to open your eyes. Art is for understanding." ~Thornton Dial [1]