african american art, african american artist, Art, Art History, Artists, Black Art History, Blog

Neptune Thurston – Portrait Painter

It was even discovered that Neptune Thurston taught artist, Gilbert Stuart how to paint heads and faces.**

african american art, african american artist, Art, Art History, Artists, Black Art History, Blog, collage, Contemporary Art, painting

Thornton Dial – Artist

"Art is strange-looking stuff and most people don’t understand art. Most people don’t understand my art, the art of the Negroes, because most people don’t understand me, don’t understand the Negroes at all. If everybody understand one another, wouldn’t nobody make art. Art is something to open your eyes. Art is for understanding." ~Thornton Dial [1]

african american art, african american artist, Art, Art History, Artists, Black Art History, Black Women, Blog, Contemporary Art

Eartha Kitt (From “Anna Lucasta”) by Charles White

In a recent blog post about Dr. Kellie Jones, I found this art work by Charles White one of the artist discussed in South of Pico. I absolutely love Eartha Kitt and had to know more about this artwork.

African, african american art, african american artist, African art, African Mask, Art, Art History, Artists, Black Art Historians, Black Art History, Blog, Iconography, sculpture

African Mask & Harlem Renaissance Art: Loïs Mailou Jones

Last month I found and shared  information about artist Lois Maillou Jones. I'm curious about African masks so I continue to explore the subject. I really enjoyed how she used these sculptures in her compositions. The above image is Les Fetiches, which displays multiple mask resting one over the other.

African, african american art, african american artist, African art, Art, Art History, Artists, Black Art Historians, Black Art History, Black Madonna, Black Women, Blog, Iconography, sculpture

“Madonna” by Elizabeth Catlett

From an early age I've always been fascinated by the Madonna and child imagery. "Madonna, in Christian art, depiction of the Virgin Mary; the term is usually restricted to those representations that are devotional rather than narrative and that show her in a nonhistorical context and emphasize later doctrinal or sentimental significance. The Madonna is accompanied most often by the infant Christ, [but she can be depicted alone.]" [1]