african american art, african american artist, Art, Art History, Black Art Historians, Black Art History, Blog, Contemporary Art, Harlem Reinassance

Richard Powell- Art & Art History

Richard J. Powell is John Spencer Bassett Professor of Art & Art History at Duke University, where he has taught since 1989.  He studied at Morehouse College and Howard University before earning his doctorate in art history at Yale University.  Along with teaching courses in American art, the arts of the African Diaspora, and contemporary visual studies, he has written extensively on topics ranging from primitivism to postmodernism, including such titles as Homecoming: The Art and Life of William H. Johnson (1991), Black Art: A Cultural History (1997 & 2002), and Cutting a Figure: Fashioning Black Portraiture (2008).[1]

african american art, african american artist, Black Art History, Blog, Harlem Reinassance, sculpture

Book: Augusta Savage Renaissance Woman

I initially was attracted to her story because of the fact she didn't let her personal life overshadow her career. As a working woman with children it can be difficult to find that balance. Especially, as a working African American woman in the arts during a very difficult time period. She paved the way for artists of color, women and inspired many sculptors, painters and more. Augusta Savage was an artist, educator and activist, a true Renaissance woman.

african american art, african american artist, Art, Art History, Black Art History, Blog, Contemporary Art, dance, Harlem Reinassance, music, painting

Chorus Lines, Rhythm & Blues: Artist Archibald J. Motley Jr.

I think I've fallen in love with this art piece. Excerpt from Nasher, Motley was 70 years old when he painted the oil on canvas, Hot Rhythm, in 1961. This painting explores one of Motley’s favorite subjects, the jazz age. The artist loved to walk the streets of Bronzeville, a once-thriving neighborhood in Chicago’s South… Continue reading Chorus Lines, Rhythm & Blues: Artist Archibald J. Motley Jr.