african american art, african american artist, Art, Art History, Black Art History, Black Women, Blog, Contemporary Art, dance, sculpture

Muse for “Glory” by Elizabeth Catlett

In a recent blog post about Elizabeth Catlett's sculpture tilted "Glory" I wanted to know more about the art work. Who is the woman depicted? What is her significance to the arts and history? After researching I was amazed. The woman sculpted below is Glory Van Scott, actor, dancer, and educator. Read the excerpt of her story here.

african american art, african american artist, Art, Art History, Black Art Historians, Black Art History, Black Women, Blog, Contemporary Art, Professor, sculpture

“Glory” inspires Quiet Pride: The Elizabeth Catlett Project

Elizabeth Catlett's "Glory" inspires music. The sculptures of the late African-American artist and civil rights activist Elizabeth Catlett are the inspiration for a new jazz composition. Rufus Reid, a bass musician who's been playing jazz for half a century, uses Catlett's artwork to explore the intersection between music and the visual arts. In his new project, called "Quiet Pride," Reid tries to convey Catlett's sculptures in sound. [1]

african american art, african american artist, Art, Art History, Artists, Black Art Historians, Black Art History, Blog, sculpture

Dr. Selma Burke – Sculptor

Some of Burke’s most notable sculptures include Temptation (1938),  Despair (1951),  Fallen Angel(1958), Mother and Child (1968), and Together (1975).  A nine-foot statue of Martin Luther King, Jr. she completed while in her eighties is on display in Marshall Park in Charlotte, North Carolina.  She received numerous awards and honors which included three honorary doctorate degrees.  In 1979 Burke was recognized by President Jimmy Carter for her contribution to African American art history.[4]

African, african american art, african american artist, African art, Art, Art History, Artists, Black Art Historians, Black Art History, Black Women, Blog, sculpture

Meta Vaux Warrick Fuller – Sculptor

Created at the dawn of the Harlem Renaissance, Fuller's sculpture "Ethiopia" is widely considered the first Pan-African American work of art. Fuller  studied with Raphaël Collin and was mentored by painter Henry Ossawa Tanner. Her work symbolized a new black identity that was emerging through the Renaissance and represented a pridefulness in African and black heritage and identity

Art, Art History, Artists, Black Women, Blog, Contemporary Art, Professor

Faith Ringgold – Painter, Writer, Speaker, Sculptor & Performance Artist

Since the early 1960s, Faith Ringgold has been known for her story quilts, politically charged paintings and prints, and illustrated children’s books. She has eloquently articulated a critical perspective on American identity through the lenses of the feminist and civil rights movements.***