african american art, african american artist, Art, Art History, Black Art Historians, Black Art History, Black Women, Blog, Contemporary Art, Professor, sculpture

“Glory” inspires Quiet Pride: The Elizabeth Catlett Project

Elizabeth Catlett's "Glory" inspires music. The sculptures of the late African-American artist and civil rights activist Elizabeth Catlett are the inspiration for a new jazz composition. Rufus Reid, a bass musician who's been playing jazz for half a century, uses Catlett's artwork to explore the intersection between music and the visual arts. In his new project, called "Quiet Pride," Reid tries to convey Catlett's sculptures in sound. [1]

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“Singing Head” by Elizabeth Catlett

Elizabeth Catlett, Singing Head, 1980, black Mexican marble, Smithsonian American Art Museum, 16 x 9 1/2 x 12 in. (40.7 x 24.2 x 30.5 cm.)


african american art, african american artist, Art, Art History, Black Art Historians, Black Art History, Black Women, Blog, Contemporary Art

“Untitled” New Orleans Series by Gwendolyn Knight, 1941

"Untitled" New Orleans Series by Gwendolyn Knight, 1941


african american art, african american artist, Art, Art History, Artists, Black Art Historians, Black Art History, Black Women, Blog, Contemporary Art, Photography

Marilyn Nance – Artist & Photojournalist

Marilyn Nance is a photojournalist who goes her own way. She wants to tell the truth, particularly about her own community whom she calls ordinary working class Black folks. She follows her instincts, leading her down paths beyond still photography. Marilyn noted in a lecture at the Library of Congress, ". . . the commercial media often has no interest in showing the images that I feel need to be shown."1

african american art, african american artist, African art, Art, Art History, Artists, Black Art Historians, Black Art History, Blog, Contemporary Art, sculpture

Renee Stout – Artist

Starting with simple, house-shaped boxes into which she put feathers, beadwork she herself created, tiny bones, buttons, and memorabilia of family members, Stout progressed to creating "divining tables" and room-size installations. At the same time, she began developing an ongoing fictional narrative- the story of the stay-at-home Dorothy and the African explorer Colonel Frank- which she recorded in notebooks and which became another thread tying her work firmly to American and African traditions.[3]