african american art, african american artist, Art, Art History, Black Art Historians, Black Art History, Blog, Contemporary Art, Harlem Reinassance

Richard Powell- Art & Art History

Richard J. Powell is John Spencer Bassett Professor of Art & Art History at Duke University, where he has taught since 1989.  He studied at Morehouse College and Howard University before earning his doctorate in art history at Yale University.  Along with teaching courses in American art, the arts of the African Diaspora, and contemporary visual studies, he has written extensively on topics ranging from primitivism to postmodernism, including such titles as Homecoming: The Art and Life of William H. Johnson (1991), Black Art: A Cultural History (1997 & 2002), and Cutting a Figure: Fashioning Black Portraiture (2008).[1]

african american art, african american artist, Art, Art History, Artists, Black Art History, Blog

Neptune Thurston – Portrait Painter

It was even discovered that Neptune Thurston taught artist, Gilbert Stuart how to paint heads and faces.**

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“My Soul Has Grown Deep”

My Soul Has Grown Deep considers the art-historical significance of contemporary Black artists and quilters working throughout the southeastern United States and Alabama in particular. See sources for more Information.

african american art, african american artist, Art, Art History, Artists, Black Art History, Black Women, Blog, Contemporary Art

Eartha Kitt (From “Anna Lucasta”) by Charles White

In a recent blog post about Dr. Kellie Jones, I found this art work by Charles White one of the artist discussed in South of Pico. I absolutely love Eartha Kitt and had to know more about this artwork.

african american art, african american artist, Art, Art History, Black Art Historians, Black Art History, Black Women, Contemporary Art, Curator, Museum Director

South of Pico by Kellie Jones

In South of Pico Kellie Jones explores how the artists in Los Angeles's black communities during the 1960s and 1970s created a vibrant, productive, and engaged activist arts scene in the face of structural racism. Emphasizing the importance of African American migration, as well as L.A.'s housing and employment politics, Jones shows how the work of black Angeleno artists such as Betye Saar, Charles White, Noah Purifoy, and Senga Nengudi spoke to the dislocation of migration, L.A.'s urban renewal, and restrictions on black mobility.