african american art, african american artist, Black Art History, Blog, Harlem Reinassance, sculpture

Book: Augusta Savage Renaissance Woman

I initially was attracted to her story because of the fact she didn't let her personal life overshadow her career. As a working woman with children it can be difficult to find that balance. Especially, as a working African American woman in the arts during a very difficult time period. She paved the way for artists of color, women and inspired many sculptors, painters and more. Augusta Savage was an artist, educator and activist, a true Renaissance woman.

african american art, african american artist, Art, Art History, Artists, Black Art History, Blog

Neptune Thurston – Portrait Painter

It was even discovered that Neptune Thurston taught artist, Gilbert Stuart how to paint heads and faces.**

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“My Soul Has Grown Deep”

My Soul Has Grown Deep considers the art-historical significance of contemporary Black artists and quilters working throughout the southeastern United States and Alabama in particular. See sources for more Information.

african american art, african american artist, Art, Art History, Black Art History, Blog, Contemporary Art, dance, Harlem Reinassance, music, painting

Chorus Lines, Rhythm & Blues: Artist Archibald J. Motley Jr.

I think I've fallen in love with this art piece. Excerpt from Nasher, Motley was 70 years old when he painted the oil on canvas, Hot Rhythm, in 1961. This painting explores one of Motley’s favorite subjects, the jazz age. The artist loved to walk the streets of Bronzeville, a once-thriving neighborhood in Chicago’s South… Continue reading Chorus Lines, Rhythm & Blues: Artist Archibald J. Motley Jr.

african american art, african american artist, Art, Art History, Black Art Historians, Black Art History, Black Women, Blog, Contemporary Art, Professor, sculpture

“Glory” inspires Quiet Pride: The Elizabeth Catlett Project

Elizabeth Catlett's "Glory" inspires music. The sculptures of the late African-American artist and civil rights activist Elizabeth Catlett are the inspiration for a new jazz composition. Rufus Reid, a bass musician who's been playing jazz for half a century, uses Catlett's artwork to explore the intersection between music and the visual arts. In his new project, called "Quiet Pride," Reid tries to convey Catlett's sculptures in sound. [1]